Workshop Descriptions (Adult)

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Friday, November 3 | Workshop Session I | 10:30 – 12:00 pm

 

A1: APPLYING THE SCIENCE OF THE POSITIVE TO GROW POSITIVE COMMUNITY NORM
Jeff Linkenbach, Ph.D., MA in Counseling, Research Scientist at The Montana Institute & Fellow at the University of Montana – Mansfield Academy of Global Leadership
The Science of the Positive is the study of how positive factors impact culture and experience. It focuses on how to measure and grow the Positive, and has been applied over decades with individuals, state agencies, communities, and educational institutions. It is based on seven core assumptions that can be applied to ourselves, our families, our workplaces, tribes, and our communities. This program will focus on uncovering and applying the seven core assumptions of the Science of the Positive to grow positive community norms. The Science of the Positive should not be confused with simple “positive thinking.” It is a rigorous process that works across entire communities and cultures. And while the Science of the Positive is based on the core assumption that the positive exists in every community and culture, it recognizes that suffering, pain, and harm are very real. One of its principal aims is to reduce suffering in our families, our communities, and ourselves – by strategically framing the integration of both concern and hope.

 

A2: MEDICINE ABUSE PREVENTION & SECURE MEDICINE RETURN POLICIES
Margaret Shield, Ph.D., Community Environmental Health Strategies LLC; Erin James, MBA, CPP, Outreach Marijuana & Opiate Prevention Coordinator, King County Behavioral Health and Recovery Division
Preventing abuse of prescription opioids and other medications starts with the home medicine cabinet. We will examine “Mind Your Meds” strategies, with a focus on policies to increase convenient options for safe medicine disposal. Learn how new drop boxes in pharmacies and hospitals, as well as prepaid return mailers, are now provided by drug manufacturers in counties with Secure Medicine Return ordinances.

 

A3: DOES YOUTH ADVOCACY REALLY PAY?
Janine Koffel, MS.Ed, CPP, Health Promotion and Prevention Professional
Teens get involved in prevention coalition work for a lot of different reasons, but few probably think about how their experience can increase their cash money earning power. Employers today want skilled and savvy employees with strong ‘soft’ skills like problem-solving, critical thinking, public speaking confidence and demonstrated ability to work collaboratively. Do your teens realize they have those skills? It’s up to you, as their mentor/adviser to help them identify how they are becoming workplace ready through their work with your coalition. You can help them earn scholarships, become employed, or be accepted to college. This workshop will show you how!

 

A4: OPIOIDS – CHARACTERISTICS, PREVALENCE, POLICIES
Steven Freng, Psy.D., MSW, Prevention/Treatment Manager, Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA)
The opioid epidemic continues unabated nationally and in the Pacific Northwest. Learn about the history of opioids and their place in ancient and modern cultures; the various pharmaceutical opioids available and specific detail about the most commonly prescribed medications; the effects of opioids; background information about heroin — and fentanyl; overdose prevention; syringe exchanges; safe disposal practices; and web addresses for more information.

 

A5: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE – EXPLORING THE INTERFACE BETWEEN EVIDENCE RATING SYSTEMS AND PRACTITIONERS
Adam Darnell, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP)
This presentation will begin with an overview of WSIPP’s evidence rating system, discussing the different inventories WSIPP produces and our website, including a brief discussion of our methods for assessing evidence and conducting benefit-cost analysis. We will also discuss findings from the most recent updates of WSIPP’s inventories of youth and adult behavioral health programming, focusing on prevention programs generally. The intent of the presentation is to familiarize attendees with the information available from WSIPP resources, as well as to explore how attendees use evidence from WSIPP or other sources, in the interest of improving the flow of information between research and practice arenas. We will invite questions and feedback concerning WSIPP resources throughout the session.

 

A6: ADVOCACY FOR PREVENTION PEOPLE
Anna Marie Dufault, M.Ed., Learning Support Coordinator, ESD 105; Lisa Stewart, WASAVP Board Member
Me? An advocate? That’s right, YOU are! The voice of prevention people is important. Come learn why and how to effectively advocate with a variety of audiences and strengthen your advocacy strategies to engage the whole community.


Friday, November 3 | Workshop Session II | 2:30 – 4:00 PM

 

B1: DBHR – MINERVA: PLANNING FOR DATA ENTRY
Seth W. Greenfest, Ph.D., DBHR Prevention System Project Manager
In this workshop, Dr. Greenfest will provide updated information and guidance on Planning for Data Entry, including working with Personally Identifiable Information, understanding state and federal laws (such as HIPAA and FERPA), and how to implement a data entry plan that is secure and confidential.

 

B2: A DISCUSSION OF PREVENTION ETHICS IN THE LEGAL ERA – UNPACKING THE GRAYS
Derek Franklin, MA, WASAVP Board Member; Liz Wilhelm, M.S., CPP, PSCBW Ethics Chair, WASAVP Co-VP
As prevention professionals, whether we are certified or not, whether we work in community coalitions or school settings, we are all bound by some code of ethical conduct. In recent years, the prevention field has seen significant changes in funding levels and sources, workforce strength, partners in our work, and the status and availability of the drugs targeted by our prevention strategies. Join members of the Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington and the Washington Association of Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention in reviewing the current Prevention Code of Ethical Conduct as applied to our state’s contemporary prevention work in unpacking the gray. (1.5 ethics CEH).

 

B3: FOREFRONT IN THE SCHOOLS: A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION AND SUICIDE PREVENTION
Shira Rosen, MSW, Director of Schools and Higher Education Programs, Forefront Suicide Prevention; Harry Brown, MA, LMFT, Middle School Counselor, Mercer Island Schools
This workshop will explore Forefront in the Schools, a school-based cohort model for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. We will discuss the model, results to date, go through a short version of the LEARN™ suicide prevention training and provide resources. There will be time to discuss what you do in your own school or district and ways you can enhance the work.

 

B4: SUICIDE AND SUBSTANCE USE
Shannon Bailie, MSW, Director of Health & Wellness, University of Washington
Both substance use and suicide are concerns in our communities, particularly for our youth. This workshop will discuss current trends and community strategies for addressing these co-occurring topics.

 

B5: THE MILITARY, ITS CULTURE, ITS FAMILY
Janis Clark, Ph.D. Candidate, M.S., HRMD, B.A., Business Management – Retired Commissioned Officer in the Military, The Military Wellness Initiative Network (MILWIN)
Introduction to how the uniqueness of the military culture is linked to increasing capacity, outreach and engagement to Military Service Members, Veterans and Their Families in Washington State. This workshop will help you facilitate improved collaboration and coordination of prevention services to the desired military populations.

 

B6: FINDINGS FROM THE 2ND REQUIRED REPORT ON THE EVALUATION AND BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS OF I-502
Adam Darnell, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP)
Washington’s recreational marijuana law, Initiative 502 (I-502), required the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to conduct a benefit-cost evaluation of implementation of the law from its enactment in 2012 through 2032. In this presentation I will discuss the second required report, released September 1, including preliminary findings of outcome analyses to identify effects of I-502 on youth and adult substance use, cannabis abuse treatment admissions, and drug-related criminal convictions. These findings represent a snapshot of our progress to date and are an intermediate step towards the ultimate benefit-cost analysis of I-502.

 

B7: STARTS WITH ONE – WASHINGTON OPIOID AWARENESS CAMPAIGN
Michelle Hege, BA in English Literature, MS in Organizational Communication, APR, CEO, DH; Hayley Graham, BBA, Account Director, DH
The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) has launched an opioid abuse prevention campaign. The campaign is designed to inform and educate Washingtonians about the dangers of prescription drug misuse and abuse as well as promote safe storage and safe disposal practices. This workshop will provide an overview of the campaign and a focus on how communities can use campaign tactics in their own areas.


Friday, November 3 | Workshop Session III | 4:15 – 5:45 PM

 

C1: SOCIAL JUSTICE: HEAD, HEART, AND COMMUNITY
Vaughnetta Barton, MSW, University of Washington
We’ve known for a long time that prevention services make an impact. We do this work from the heart with a commitment to those in our community. Where does social justice fit and how can I add it to my work and to my life—for greater impact? Attendees will leave this session knowing how they can impact social justice issues in their community.

 

C2: POWER OF THE PARTNERSHIP: ESD’S, CPWI AND OTHER PREVENTION PARTNERS
Anna Marie Dufault, M.Ed., Learning Support Coordinator, ESD 105
School aged youth spend on average six hours a day in school. These youth are the prime audience for prevention efforts. Come learn how to successfully partner with schools and districts in your community to significantly impact youth, their peers and families.

 

C3: MENTORING IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Pamila Gant, Sr. Program Officer, Mentoring Works WA
Helping students to write the narrative they want for their future is the focus of this workshop. Here you will learn why and how critical consciousness is beneficial for your program, your mentors, and the youth, and their families. In this workshop, we will work with some new tools you can use to incorporate critical consciousness for your mentor and mentee training curriculum.

 

C4: PREVENTION EFFORTS AND OUTCOMES IN THE NOOKSACK INDIAN TRIBE
Nooksack Indian Tribe – Peter Joseph, SPF TIG Director, Treatment Director; Frank James, Epidemiologist, Medical Officer; Julia Dilley, Lead Evaluator
The Nooksack Indian Tribe will be presenting their efforts in the field of tribal prevention, as well as successes and outcomes to date. The speakers will include successes from their recent and past federal grant awards, including their work with the Strategic Prevention Framework For Prescriptions Drugs (SPF-Rx) grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

 

C5: HOW TO BECOME A CERTIFIED PREVENTION PROFESSIONAL (CPP) (YOU CAN DO IT!)
Jackie Berganio, BA, CPP, ICPS, Community Coordinator; Gunthild Sondhi, M.Ed., CPP, ICPS, President, Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington; Erin James, MBA, CPP, Outreach Marijuana & Opiate Prevention Coordinator
Wonder what types of jobs are available in the prevention field? Are you required to obtain a CPP by your employer and/or funder? Come to this workshop and learn from Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington members who will talk about how they obtained their CPP and provide you insights to make your credentialing process more manageable. A sample application form will also be shared and information will be given about the testing process.

 

C6: DEFINING AND USING EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAMS, PRACTICES AND STRATEGIES FOR COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION
Julia Havens, CPP, Prevention System Implementation Manager, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; Angie Funaiole, MS, Ph.D. Candidate, Prevention System Manager, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
This workshop will provide an overview of the ways that Washington State Department of Social and Health Services’ Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DSHS/DBHR) Substance Use Disorder Prevention and Mental Health Promotion Unit defines, categorizes, and uses evidence-based programs and practices (EBPs). We will explore, in an interactive way, why EBPs are important in prevention, criteria, and considerations for selecting EBPs. Implementation fidelity and adaptations as well as evaluation will also be discussed.

 

C7: STARTS WITH ONE – WASHINGTON OPIOID AWARENESS CAMPAIGN
Michelle Hege, BA in English Literature, MS in Organizational Communication, APR, CEO, DH; Hayley Graham, BBA, Account Director, DH
The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) has launched an opioid abuse prevention campaign. The campaign is designed to inform and educate Washingtonians about the dangers of prescription drug misuse and abuse as well as promote safe storage and safe disposal practices. This workshop will provide an overview of the campaign and a focus on how communities can use campaign tactics in their own areas.


Saturday, November 4 | Workshop Session IV | 9:45 – 11:15 AM

 

D1: SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR PREVENTION WITH LGBTQ YOUTH
Jeremy Goldbach, Ph.D., LMSW, Assistant Professor, USC
Sexual and Gender minority youth (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) report significantly higher rates of substance use from their peers. This workshop will help participants understand the many different factors that influence youth, in an effort to help identify new approaches to prevention practice.

 

D2: HEALTHY NATIVE YOUTH: SHARING ENGAGING, CULTURALLY-RELEVANT HEALTH CURRICULA FOR NATIVE YOUTH
Colbie Caughlan, MPH, Suicide Prevention Project Manager, Healthy Native Youth, NW Portland Area Indian Health Board
It can be challenging for health educators to locate engaging, age-appropriate health curricula for Native youth. Healthy Native Youth is a one-stop-shop for tribal health advocates to access effective, culturally-relevant healthy decision-making curricula for AI/AN youth. The portal allows users to filter and compare curricula on several dimensions to determine best-fit. It includes all materials needed for implementation, including: facilitator training tools, lesson plans, marketing materials, information about how the program was designed, evaluation findings, and references to publications and reports. The site also allows users to upload and submit their own health curricula for national distribution. Workshop participants will take a sneak peek at curricula available on the site, including a new video training that will prepare adults who work with Native youth to identify youth who post or view concerning posts on social media, and connect them to appropriate services.

 

D3: WHAT IS MENTORING IN WASHINGTON? HOW CAN YOU START A PROGRAM OR EMBED PRACTICES?
Janet Heubach, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Programs, Mentoring Works Washington
This session presents the research-based youth mentoring Standards, the range of youth mentoring as practiced in Washington, a profile of the size and purposes of the more than 100 formal mentoring programs in Washington, common challenges experienced by youth mentoring programs, and a brief review of seminal research on youth outcomes, including the ground-breaking 2017 research on match endings in mentoring relationships. Participants will be engaged in a discussion of how essential practices for youth mentoring can be embedded in other youth development programs. The presenter also will guide participants to the key national and regional resources for formal youth mentoring programs, including the National Quality Mentoring System and varied Toolkits from MENTOR.

 

D4: PROBLEM GAMBLING – FROM PREVENTION TO RECOVERY
Jim Leingang, B.A., CDP, WSGC II, Community Engagement and Advocacy Specialist, Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling; Elizabeth Glavish, B.A., Communications and Outreach Specialist, Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling
This session will provide a holistic view of problem gambling in Washington State, including Prevention Awareness, Education, Treatment and Aftercare. We will examine limits and gaps in services, emerging trends and building support communities. Special attention will be paid to prevention best practices and programs currently supported by the Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling.

 

D5: EFFECTIVE COMMUNITY COALITION AND TRIBAL PARNERSHIPS BEGIN WITH ABC AND END WITH XYZ
Ladonna Boyd-Bluff, BA, CDP, Prevention Coordinator, Kalispel Tribe; Carrie McKinley, Certified Prevention Professional (CPP), Prevention Specialist and CPWI Coalition Coordinator, Pend Oreille County Counseling Services
This workshop is about continuing effective partnerships through respectful communication, active listening and enhanced collaboration on projects and events in our shared community.

 

D6: DRUG DIVERSION: WHAT IT MEANS AND HOW TO PREVENT IT
Ricardo Quintero, Diversion Program Manager (DPM), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
This session will bring medical professionals up to date on their role in helping to curb the problem of prescription drug abuse, identifying common “red flags” regarding errant prescribing, and recognizing forgeries and recipient drug-seeking behavior, as well as details regarding the rescheduling of hydrocodone and much more.